Corruption and Realism in Late Socialist China: The Return of the Political Novel

By Jeffrey C. Kinkley | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I have many to thank for helping me bring this book to completion. Lu Tianming, Chen Fang (who passed away in 2005), and Zhang Ping in China as well as Mo Yan, Yu Jie, and Qiu Xiaolong in America took time from their busy writing and filming careers to sit for interviews. On-site help in Beijing was arranged by Ai Qun and his staff at the Masses' Press. Valuable assistance finding written materials came from Ken Harlin, Richard Jandovitz, and others at the C. V. Starr Library of Columbia University and the Princeton Gest Library. Earlier research for Chinese Justice, the Fiction (Stanford University Press, 2000), to which the present book may be considered a sequel, was partially funded by the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Education Exchange.

Yet more assistance in China came from Hua Jian of Shanghai and Yu Fenggao of Hangzhou. Over the years, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences has provided many introductions to Chinese authors and libraries. Unusual support was also rendered by the Academia Sinica of Taiwan, which hosted me for a month of research on the present project at the gracious initiative of Dr. Peng Hsiao-yen.

St. John's University provided release time for research and writing that sped the project along; further appreciation is due the University Seminars at Columbia University for their help in publication, both financial and intellectual, since the ideas in this work benefited from discussions in the University Seminar on Modern China. Understanding corruption is a tricky thing, of course; to name all the institutions in New

-vii-

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Corruption and Realism in Late Socialist China: The Return of the Political Novel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: The Trendsetter 22
  • 3: The Banned Blockbuster 47
  • 4: Climax 78
  • 5: Anticorruption by Indirection 104
  • 6: Dirt Plus Soap Equals Pay Dirt 125
  • 7: Chinese Realism, Popular Culture, and the Critics 144
  • 8: Conclusion 170
  • Reference Matter 191
  • Notes 193
  • Bibliography 229
  • Character List 269
  • Index 275
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