In Pursuit of the Almighty's Dollar: A History of Money and American Protestantism

By James Hudnut-Beumler | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Since this a book about money, it is only appropriate that I seek to discharge some debts.

A sabbatical and much of the research was financed through the help of a generous grant from the Lilly Endowment, Inc., and I was consistently encouraged by the senior program director, Fred Hofheinz, and the vice president for religion, Craig Dykstra.

Across the years, I have had encouragement from a wide range of scholars in the historical and theological disciplines. Robert Wood Lynn shared a love for the early nineteenth-century materials that I use in this work. Seven other scholars associated with the Material History of American Religion Project, which I directed in the late 1990s, read drafts, offered pointers, and helped account for further authorial choices. Dan Sack provided innumerable hours of support as associate director of the project and never failed to be an outstanding sounding board for new approaches to the questions I sought to ask. Robert Orsi asked me early on whether I disliked the clergy about whom I wrote, leading me to the insight that I did not dislike people who raised money for religious causes so much as I felt for them because of the terrible ironies expressed in their lives through their appeals. Diane Winston helped me recognize the right tone to use in bringing the voices of the religious actors to print. Colleen McDannel asked where the people were in some of my building illustrations and thereby inspired the chapter in this book on the testimonies of ministers' wives, the missing people in far too many discussions of the Protestant churches. Marie Griffith, Leigh Schmidt, David Watt, Judith Weisenfeld, and David Morgan rounded out a group of early conversation partners whose enthusiasms reassured me in the pursuit of my inquiry that no topics were off limits in the study of American religion.

At Vanderbilt, my colleagues Kathleen Flake, James Byrd, and Dale Johnson have offered helpful comments and readings along the way. Jane Gleim and

-xvii-

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