In Pursuit of the Almighty's Dollar: A History of Money and American Protestantism

By James Hudnut-Beumler | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Stewardship in Crisis and Technique in
Ascendancy, 1920–1945

By 1920, stewardship as a way of both raising money and building true Christians had so triumphed in the thinking of Protestant leaders that it had achieved the status of a panacea. Like other cure-alls, however, stewardship would fail to deliver on its most extravagant promises. And as this failure became noted, different techniques for raising money and different ways of thinking about giving for church causes began to be advanced more freely. By the end of World War II, stewardship concepts returned in a highly modified form in American preaching. Meanwhile, fund-raising techniques in Protestant church circles had been honed with businesslike precision.

In the 1920s, despite growing domestic prosperity, missionary agencies at home and abroad began to notice significant declines in receipts. This troubled mission leaders, and at their annual Foreign Missions Conference of North America in January 1928 they voted to ask the Institute of Social and Religious Research to make a study of foreign missionary giving by Protestant churches since 1900. The institute itself was closely connected with mission interests, and its board members included Kenyon Butterfield, W. H. P. Faunce, Francis J. McConnell, and John R. Mott, who served as chairman. The research task was assigned to Charles H. Fahs, who proved to be an excellent choice for several reasons. In a short time he mounted the first study of church giving to employ

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
In Pursuit of the Almighty's Dollar: A History of Money and American Protestantism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 267

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.