The E-Policy Handbook: Rules and Best Practices to Safely Manage Your Company's E-Mail, Blogs, Social Networking, and Other Electronic Communication Tools

By Nancy Flynn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Legal Risks and Rules
E-Mail Creates Discoverable Evidence

Where does your organization stand on the matter of electronic evi- dence? Do you know the difference between business-critical e-mail that must be retained for legal or regulatory purposes versus insignificant messages that may be deleted in the ordinary course of business? Is your e-mail archive a dangerous mix of professional correspondence and personal conversations that could potentially embarrass your employees and sabotage your firm2019s legal position? Would you be able to locate and produce legally compliant e-mail messages and attachments quickly and responsively if ordered to do so by a court or regulatory body?


Struggling with E-Mail Business Record Retention?
You Are Not Alone

In 2006, 24 percent of employers had e-mail subpoenaed by courts or regulators, up from 9 percent just five years earlier. And 15 percent of organizations went to court in 2006 to battle lawsuits specifically trig- gered by employees2019 smoking-gun e-mails, according to American Man- agement Association/ePolicy Institute research.1

In spite of e-mail2019s growing evidentiary role, however, only 34 per- cent of U.S. companies have implemented written e-mail record reten- tion policies and deletion schedules .2 Of the 66 percent of businesses that do not formally preserve and systematically dispose of e-mail records according to written rules and schedules, some save all their messages, others purge everything, and still others approach record retention and deletion as hit-or-miss propositions.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The E-Policy Handbook: Rules and Best Practices to Safely Manage Your Company's E-Mail, Blogs, Social Networking, and Other Electronic Communication Tools
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 323

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.