The E-Policy Handbook: Rules and Best Practices to Safely Manage Your Company's E-Mail, Blogs, Social Networking, and Other Electronic Communication Tools

By Nancy Flynn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Online Privacy Risks, Rights,
and Rules

Do you employ young people in their 20s or even in their teens? If so, you may face a stiff challenge when attempting to impose privacy rules and confidentiality guidelines that are designed to help protect company secrets and employees2019 personal business as well.

While older employees tend to view technology as a means to trans- mit, store, and access information, younger workers rely on electronic communication tools for relationship building, networking, and socializ- ing. Seventy percent of 18- to 19-year-old students access social net- working sites daily, compared to just 4 percent of those over 30, according to the EDUCAUSE.1

Instant messaging, texting, and social networking are standard tools in the Internet generation2019s electronic communication arsenal. Young people are so accustomed to communicating online that many think nothing of expressing their most personal thoughts, provocative opinions, and private images with their 201Cclosest online friends,201D who may number in the hundreds, thousands, or even millions in the case of wildly popular blogs and social networking sites.


There Are No Secrets in Cyberspace

The youngest members of an organization are much more likely to spread business-related gossip than older employees, who still tend to place a premium on privacy. Only 9 percent of the workforce2019s youngest

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