The E-Policy Handbook: Rules and Best Practices to Safely Manage Your Company's E-Mail, Blogs, Social Networking, and Other Electronic Communication Tools

By Nancy Flynn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 16
Blog Policies and Best
Practices

When it comes to employee blog use, there simply is no way to guarantee a completely risk-free environment. Whether blogging at the office or at home, even the most conscientious employees are prone to accidents and missteps. And there is always a chance that a rogue employee will inten- tionally publish blog content that creates problems for the organization.

That said, you can limit liability somewhat by developing and imple- menting comprehensive blog rules and policies that address issues including content, language, confidentiality, copyright, defamation, pri- vacy, monitoring, compliance, personal use, retention, regulatory rules, and disciplinary action among other key issues.

Blog policies may not be required by law, but they certainly can help keep your organization out of legal hot water. To date, employers have spent millions of dollars defending and settling lawsuits related to the improper use of e-mail, IM, and the Internet. Blogging is certain to exacerbate an already litigious business environment.


Put Best Practices to Work with the 3-Es of Blog
Risk Management

Employers are advised to put best practices to work by focusing on the 3-Es of blog risk management to comply with government regulations, prevent accidental misuse and intentional abuse, and reduce the risk of litigation and other blog-related disasters. The 3-Es are:

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