The E-Policy Handbook: Rules and Best Practices to Safely Manage Your Company's E-Mail, Blogs, Social Networking, and Other Electronic Communication Tools

By Nancy Flynn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18
Software Risks, Rules,
Policies and Best Practices

Would you walk into your local computer store and steal a package of software for business or personal use? Of course not. Yet many people who would never consider shoplifting from a retail store are guilty of 201Dsoftlifting,201D or pirating, computer software.1

Worldwide, software piracy is so pervasive that 35 percent of the software installed on personal computers in 2006 was pirated, or illegally obtained. That amounts to more than $40 billion in global losses for the software industry, a 15 percent increase over the previous year, accord- ing to the 2007 BSA-IDC Global Software Piracy Study.2


Don2019t Let Software Pirates Sink Your
Corporate Ship

Software piracy is the unauthorized duplication and use of licensed com- puter software. Software piracy poses a unique challenge to the software industry and employers. Unlike audio tapes and videotapes, which tend to lose quality with each duplication, computer software can be copied repeatedly with almost no impact on quality. For little or no cost, any PC user can produce thousands of copies of software that may have taken years of effort and millions of dollars to develop. In the United States alone, the software industry lost $7.3 billion as a result of piracy in 2006, an increase of $400 million over 2005, according to the 2007 BSA-IDC Global Software Piracy Study.3

Software piracy can take place at the office or in the home. Copyright

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