Teaching and Learning Strategies for the Thinking Classroom

By Alan Crawford; Wendy Saul et al. | Go to book overview
CONTENTS
PREFACEix
SECTION 1: PRINCIPLES OF ACTIVE LEARNING AND CRITICAL THINKING1
The Most Productive Teaching1
Organizing Instruction for Active Learning2
Thinking Critically4
The Classroom Environment7
How to Make the Most of This Learning Program9
SECTION 2: TEACHING METHODS AND STRATEGIES10
Core Lessons and How To Read Them10
FIRST CORE LESSON: LEARNING INFORMATION FROM TEXT13
How to Read this Lesson13
LESSON13
METHODS22
Structured Overview22
Know/Want to Know/Learn23
Paired Reading/Paired Summarizing25
Value Line26
Quick-write27
VARIAT ONS AND RELATED METHODS27
What? So What? Now What?27
Brainstorming29
Paired Braninstorming29
Question Board30
Question Search31
SECOND CORE LESSON: UNDERSTANDING NARRATIVE TEXT35
How to Read this Lesson35
LESSON35
METHODS42
Directed Reading Activity (DRA)42
VARIATIONS AND RELATED METHODS44
Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DR-TA) and Chart44
THIRD CORE LESSON: COOPERATIVE LEARNING48
How to Read this Lesson49
LESSON49
METHODS54
Mix/Freeze/Pair54
Close Reading with Text Coding55
Jigsaw56
VARIATIONS AND RELATED METHODS58
Roles in Cooperative Groups58
Community Agreements59
Pens in the Middle61
Walk-Around/Talk-Around62
One Stay/Three Stray63
Academic Controversy64
Trade a Problem65

-v-

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