Bite Me: Food in Popular Culture

By Fabio Parasecoli | Go to book overview

4
Quilting the Empty Body
Food and Dieting

She was very beautiful, but so proud and haughty that she could not bear to be
surpassed in beauty by anyone. She possessed a wonderful mirror which could
answer her when she stood before it and said –

“Mirror, mirror upon the wall, Who is the fairest of all?”

The mirror answered –

“Thou, O Queen, art the fairest of all,”
and the Queen was contented, because she knew the mirror could speak nothing but
the truth.

Grimm and Grimm 1898: 9


Reflections and Visions

How many times do we look in a mirror? Every day, when we get up, we often catch ourselves staring at the sleepy-eyed face that we recognize as our own, with a mix of curiosity, boredom, and matter-of-factness that confirms to us the sometimes dubious fact that we do exist. We look awry at our reflection in the hallway mirror while rushing to work. We peek at ourselves as we walk past a shop window. We may even sneak a glance at ourselves while sipping a drink in our favorite bar, often wondering how we came to have such a dismayed demeanor.

Our reflection is a constant – though not always welcome – presence throughout our lives. We all remember the endless time spent in front of mirrors while growing up, during those awkward teen years, trying to figure out the right look to be hip, and at a total loss as to why our parents did not make us cool enough.

Mirrors often continue to haunt us as adults. After all, who is totally comfortable, at all times, with his or her reflection? Too frequenUy, it does not exactly match what the world around us promotes as acceptable or preferable. It is not only a question of clothes, hairstyles, or accessories. Our body itself frequenUy bothers us, to the point where we end up perceiving it as some external burden imposed on our real self, that inner self that does not succeed in shining through the obtrusive flesh.

-85-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bite Me: Food in Popular Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.