Working World: Careers in International Education, Exchange, and Development

By Sherry L. Muller; Mark Overmann | Go to book overview

Chapter 9
Nonprofit Organizations

The NonProfit Times, a business publication focusing on nonprofit management, reported that the United States has more than 1.5 million nonprofit organizations.1 Dr. Lester Salamon, a professor at Johns Hopkins University, conducts seminal research on nonprofit proliferation abroad, studying what he defines as the “global associational revolution.” Yet despite this explosion of nonprofit activity, confusion still sometimes exists about what a nonprofit actually is and does.

Part of the confusion stems from nomenclature. Nonprofit organizations are also called not-for-profits, or NPOs. There does not seem to be any definitive preference or consensus as to which of these terms is correct; thus, all are used. However, the terms NPO, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organization (NGO) are not always interchangeable. While nonprofits are invariably NGOs, not all NGOs are nonprofits with 501(c)(3) status. The designation 501(c) is a subsection of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, which lists provisions granting exemption from federal income tax to various charitable, nonprofit, religious, and educational organizations.

Peter Hero, president of the Community Foundation Silicon Valley, in an op-ed titled “Language Matters: It Is Time to Change Our Name” asserts that using the term nonprofit to describe an entire sector of organizations that work to support issues of public interest for noncommercial purposes is misleading. “What other sector of our society defines itself by what it is not?” he asks.2

Because of this misnomer, Hero contends, many who work outside of the nonprofit sector view it not as the vibrant, well-managed, and vitally important part of society that it generally is, but rather as a group of “wellmeaning but marginal and haphazardly managed organizations.” For Hero, referring to the nonprofit sector by a name that better affirms its value

-154-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Working World: Careers in International Education, Exchange, and Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.