American Novelists of Today

By Harry R. Warfel | Go to book overview

ABBOTT to ASCH

JANE (LUDLOW DRAKE) ABBOTT

Artist:
F. R. McGreerie
was born in Buffalo, New York. For generations her family has been connected with shipbuilding and commerce on the Great Lakes. She counted as lost any childhood vacation that was not spent on the water between Buffalo and Duluth. Her writing career began at Cornell University, where she served for two years on the editorial staff of the undergraduate newspaper. Marriage to Frank A. Abbott, a Buffalo attorney, and later maternal chores for their three children confined Mrs. Abbott's literary efforts for a time to newspaper features and plays for children. She soon fixed up a workroom on the third floor of the Abbott house and went to work on a book for girls. Later she turned to adult fiction. "I don't think my husband and children ever felt neglected," Mrs. Abbott has said. "I tried out on them everything I wrote, shared their interests, and took my writing time mostly from the time I did not spend on teas, bridge parties, women's clubs, department stores, and crowded streets."

Besides some twenty books for boys and girls, Mrs. Abbott has written fifteen romances. Kitty Frew ( 1931) concerns a girl who marries Gar Frew and refuses to allow his parents to direct the young couple's life. The Silver Fountain ( 1932) shows how Andy Keep has married Mollie, an invalid, for money to help his bankrupt father. When Virginia appears, Andy says he really wants her, but friends help him to a wise decision. Miss Jolley's Family ( 1933) is about a maiden aunt who has acted as a governess to the three motherless daughters of Adrian Daggett. Now that they are grown she must decide what to do; meantime, she pilots them over perilous shoals of marital difficulties and in the end finds romance.

Benefit Street ( 1936) portrays the selfish invalid, Amy Barron, who dominates her sister Anna until Kathie, Amy's daughter, comes home from college and a woman with a past returns from abroad. Then Amy gains freedom. In To Have, To Keep ( 1939) Diane and Bill Arden are married, and the problem is to keep the wealthy, fun-loving girl happy while the poor, proud lawyer is advancing in his profession. Lorrie ( 1941) carries a girl to success as a dancer because she refuses to be imprisoned in unhappiness. Yours for the Asking ( 1943), set in the Kentucky mountains, analyzes the conflict in the marriage of John Carter, a young, thoughtful preacher, and his pretty, red-headed wife, Darragh, who is drawn toward the impudent Leaf Garrick.

Mary Patten's Daughters ( 1945) describes the unwillingness of Charie and Flo Patten to be governed by their domineering mother, a successful business executive. The Outsiders ( 1948) brings Eliza Forrestall to New Hampshire to ownership of her grandfather's mill, which she modernizes with the help of a young visiting preacher, Chris Cameron. River's Rim ( 1950), set on the Niagara frontier in the War of 1812, places Quint Darby, the hero, under suspicion because his wealthy, snobbish father and brother sympathize with the British. Quint runs away from home to be with the American patriots.

-3-

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American Novelists of Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • BY THE SAME AUTHOR ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS vii
  • Abbott to Asch 3
  • B Babson to Bushnell 17
  • C Cabell to Cuthbert 71
  • D D'Agostino to Duncan 108
  • E Eastman to Eunson 131
  • F Faralla to Furnas 140
  • G Gabriel to Guthrie 169
  • H Hale to Hurston 190
  • Iams to Idell 224
  • J Jackson to Joseph 226
  • K Kafka to Kuhn 234
  • La Farge to Lytle 254
  • M Mackay to Myers 274
  • N Nabokov to North 317
  • O O'Dell to Ostenso Scott O'Dell 327
  • Packer to Prouty 332
  • R Rand to Rylee 350
  • S Samuel to Sylvester 370
  • Taber to Turnbull 422
  • V- Vance to Viertel Ethel Vance 432
  • W Wakeman to Wylie 438
  • Y Yates to Yoseloff 471
  • Zara 474
  • INDEX OF MARRIED NAMES AND PSEUDONYMS 477
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