Axes: Willa Cather and William Faulkner

By Merrill Maguire Skaggs | Go to book overview

3
Possession

NOW WE MUST FACE that harder question: why did Willa Cather care so much what Faulkner had done to The Professor's House in Mosquitoes, since nobody was any longer reading Mosquitoes anyway? It was out of print by 1944 when she wrote her story “Before Breakfast.” Obviously these two writers had more unfinished business. What it was and why they had it is the subject of this chapter.

Here are the facts: William Faulkner, under the tutelage of his friend and literary coach Phil Stone, first intended to be a poet. He struggled long and hard to write poetry and eventually collected enough verse to make a volume. After securing a publisher, Phil Stone wrote a short, three-page preface for the collection, mainly to introduce the poet, who was Stones main interest; the two marketed the volume as The Marble Faun. The verse here describes being frozen in a form, like sculpture. The Four Seas Company of Boston brought out the book, which finally arrived on December 15,1924. Even before the book appeared, however, the two had provided four separate, multipage lists (sent by Stone to Four Seas on October 5, 13, 19, and November 5) of names who should receive publicity flyers and order forms. These names included not only periodicals and newspapers but also individuals as remote as William Howard Taft, and addresses as far afield as

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Axes: Willa Cather and William Faulkner
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Axes xix
  • 1: A Starting Point 1
  • 2: Buzzing 21
  • 3: Possession 41
  • 4: The Sounds Become Fury 57
  • 5: Dust Tracks on Some Roads 79
  • 6: Sparring 99
  • 7: Tit for Tat 117
  • 8: Literary Hopscotch 133
  • 9: Crossing the Finish Lines 155
  • Notes 177
  • Works Cited 185
  • Index 191
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 202

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.