Fabulating Beauty: Perspectives on the Fiction of Peter Carey

By Andreas Gaile | Go to book overview

Notes on the Contributors

BILL ASHCROFT is Head of School in the School of English, University of New South Wales. He was educated at Sydney University, receiving there his BA in English, MA (Hons) in Australian Literature and his PhD in literary theory. During his academic career he has taught at Australian universities (ANU, Sydney, and UNSW) and at the University of Papua New Guinea. He is a founding exponent of postcolonial studies. His co-authored book The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literatures (1989) is a seminal text in the field of contemporary postcolonial literary studies. Other major publications include: The Post-Colonial Studies Reader (1995), Key Concepts in Post-Colonial Studies (1998, both co-authored with Gareth Griffiths and Helen Tiffin), Edward Said: The Paradox of Identity (1999), White and Deadly: Sugar and Colonialism (1999), Post-Colonial Transformation (2001), On Post-Colonial Futures: Transformations of Colonial Culture (2001), and Edward Said and the Post-Colonial (2001). Bill Ashcroft has been editor of the New Literatures Review for over twenty years and his membership on editorial boards includes Textual Practice and African Identities.

NICHOLAS BIRNS is currently on the Humanities Faculty of New School University in New York. He received his BA in English from Columbia University in 1988 and his PhD in English and American Literature from New York University in 1992. He has previously been Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Western Connecticut State University, Invited Lecturer at the University of Stockholm in Sweden, and Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Newcastle in Australia. He is interested in postcolonial literature, the modern novel, and Romanticism, as well as in the relationship between literature and history. He has published on Ouyang Yu, Gerald Murnane, Janet Frame, Patrick White, and Frank Moorhouse for Southerly, Artes, Westerly, the Zeitschrift für Anglistik und Amerikanistik, and Australian and New Zealand Studies in Canada. He is currently Editor of Antipodes: A North

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