A Fallen Idol Is Still a God: Lermontov and the Quandaries of Cultural Transition

By Elizabeth Cheresh Allen | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments and Note on the Text

The publication of this book was supported by a grant from the Madge Miller Research Fund of Bryn Mawr College, for which I am grateful.

I also wish to express my gratitude to a number of people who helped bring this book to fruition. Caryl Emerson and Gary Saul Morson gave supremely meticulous readings to different drafts of the manuscript, lead ing me to clarify key ideas and to enhance rhetorical precision throughout. William Mills Todd, III, responded at length to several drafts, offering characteristically erudite and insightful comments that prompted further research and revision. His writings on the early decades of the nineteenth century in Russia, along with those of Lewis Bagby, Lauren G. Leighton, and John Mersereau, Jr., were instrumental in developing my interpretation of Russian Romanticism and Lermontov's relationship to it. More generally, but no less importantly, I am indebted to my most influential teachers at Yale—Robert Louis Jackson, Victor Erlich, and Riccardo Picchio—whose ideas and works continue to inform my own thinking and writing. Other colleagues, most notably Dan E. Davidson, Linda Gerstein, Robin Feuer Miller, Cathy Popkin, and Stephanie Sandler, thoughtfully suggested valu able ways to strengthen specific aspects of individual chapters. Still other colleagues—Jeanette Owen, Sharon Bain, Billie Jo Stiner, and Brooke Leonard—ensured the completeness and accuracy of the final manuscript. The optimism and encouragement of my father, Sidney Cheresh, and en duringly fond memories of my mother, Theresa D. Christensen, sustained me at every stage of the writing process.

Many thanks to Andrew Frisardi for his exemplary copyediting. I would also like to express special gratitude to Norris Pope at Stanford University Press, who was an epitome of professionalism and civility in arranging for the publication of this book. Other valuable assistance at the press was

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