Diasporic Homecomings: Ethnic Return Migration in Comparative Perspective

By Takeyuki Tsuda | Go to book overview

3 Contesting Ethnic Immigration
Germany and Israel Compared

Christian Joppke and Zeev Rosenhek

FATEULLY ENTANGLED as victim and perpetrator during the twentieth century's darkest hour, Israel and Germany adopted curiously similar policies of ethnic immigration after World War II. Both states welcomed newcomers as “immigrants” for permanent settlement and membership in the national community only if they qualifIed ex ante as co-ethnics, that is, as members of the statedefning majority nation. This sets an interesting counterpoint to the reverse development in the new settler nations, such as Australia or the United States, which shifted after World War II from ethnicity and race to culturally neutral criteria of immigrant admission, most notably individual skills and family unifcation. This is not to deny the fundamentally different perceptions of these immigrations in both cases, most notably the denial by Israel and Germany that their ethnic immigrations were immigration at all but rather the “return” of co-ethnics. However, this self-perception conflicts with the fact that in each instance we are dealing with the admission of noncitizens (or “aliens”) by a state for more than temporary stays in its territory, which in common sense, as well as in international migration law (Plender 1988), constitutes immigration.

Despite basic similarities, ethnic immigration in Israel and Germany is marked by sharply differing trajectories. Whereas Jewish immigration to Israel shows no sign of weakening, the parallel return of ethnic Germans to Germany has, in principle, come to an end; a 1993 law limits the status of ethnic Germans to individuals born before 1993. The purpose of this chapter is to account for this variation, emphasizing differently structured political spaces for contesting ethnic immigration as an explanatory variable. We thus offer an interpretation of ethnic immigration that differs from the conventional

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diasporic Homecomings: Ethnic Return Migration in Comparative Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 362

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.