The Psychologies in Religion: Working with the Religious Client

By E. Thomas Dowd; Stevan Lars Nielsen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ELEVEN
Liberal Judaism

Ira S. Halper and Amy Ruth Bolton


OVERVIEW AND HISTORY OF THE FAITH

The Jewish community in the United States is diverse in a religious sense. Liberal or non-Orthodox Jews comprise the majority of this community and include members of the Conservative, Reform, Reconstructionist, Humanist, and Renewal movements as well as a significant number of unaffiliated and secular Jews. The majority of the Jews who responded to the 2000-2001 National Jewish Population Survey (United States) by saying they belonged to a synagogue, gave a Liberal affiliation.

The Liberal denominations of Judaism have their roots in the European Enlightenment of the 18th century. The Enlightenment was “a process of 'letting in the light' into the presumed darkness of the age that preceded it. The 'light' that was … to be let in was the light of reason. Reason, not received tradition or external authority, was to be the ultimate source of truth in all areas of human understanding” (Gillman, 1993, p. 7). The ideologies of present-day Liberal Jews can be traced back to Jewish religious reformers in 19th century Germany. The two major movements are Conservative Judaism and Reform Judaism. The Conservative and Reform movements share several basic principles but differ on others. Both believe that to deal effectively with modernity, Judaism must be studied in a scientific way. This means using the methodology of modern criticism in the study of the Hebrew Bible and the later rabbinic literature, comparing Jewish practices with those of other religions, and accepting as fact that throughout its development, Judaism was influenced by the conditions that existed outside of the Jewish community. Thus, neither the Torah (the first five books of the Hebrew Bible)

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychologies in Religion: Working with the Religious Client
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.