The Oxford Introduction to Proto Indo European and the Proto Indo European World

By J. P. Mallory; D. Q. Adams | Go to book overview

22
Activities
22.1Existence, Ability and Attempt368
22.2Reductive Activities371
22.3Rotary and Lateral Motion377
22.4Bind, Stick, and Smear380
22.5Bend and Press382
22.6Inflation385
22.7Extend387
22.8Throw388
22.9Clean389
22.10Movement390
22.11Pour and Flow393
22.12Come and Go394
22.13Run and Jump397
22.14Crawl, Slide, and Fall400
22.15Travel401
22.16Swim403
22.17Convey404

22.1 Existence, Ability and Attempt

Verbs associated with 'being' and 'doing' are obviously a fundamental concept in any vocabulary and such words are often very strongly reconstructable to Proto-Indo-European. A list of the basic verbs is provided in Table 22.1.

The basic verb 'to be', *h1es-, is reconstructed in its principal parts which may be displayed in tabular form (Table 22.2).

The origin of the verb is often associated with *h1ēs- 'sit', which looks like a lengthened grade derivative of *h1es-. One might compare the paradigm of Spanish ser 'be' which historically is a mixture of the Latin words for 'be' and 'sit'. The English verb 'to be' (also, e.g., OIr -b¯ıu 'become', Lat f¯ıō 'become', Lith

'be', OCS byti 'be') derives from our second form, *bheu(hx)- 'come into being', and this form tends to supply the aorist forms in a number of Indo- European groups (e.g. Grk éphūn 'would be', Skt ábhūt 'was', and perhaps Lat fuī'was, have been', OCS by 'was'). It also exhibits nominal derivatives such as *bhuto- 'dwelling' (e.g. OIr both 'hut', Nfiels bod 'dwelling', OPrus buttan 'house', Lith bùtas 'house').

-368-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Oxford Introduction to Proto Indo European and the Proto Indo European World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps xii
  • List of Figures xiii
  • List of Tables xiv
  • List of Abbreviations and Acronyms xix
  • Introduction xxiii
  • 1: Discovery 1
  • 2: The Elements 12
  • 3: Reconstructing Proto-Indo-European 39
  • 4: The System 54
  • 5: Relationships 71
  • 6: A Place in Time 86
  • 7: Reconstructing the Proto-Indo-Europeans 106
  • 8: The Physical World 120
  • 9: Indo-European Fauna 132
  • 10: Indo-European Flora 156
  • 11: Anatomy 173
  • 12: Family and Kinship 203
  • 13: Hearth and Home 219
  • 14: Clothing and Textiles 230
  • 15: Material Culture 239
  • 16: Food and Drink 254
  • 17: Proto-Indo-European Society 266
  • 18: Space and Time 287
  • 19: Number and Quantity 307
  • 20: Mind, Emotions, and Sense Perception 321
  • 21: Speech and Sound 352
  • 22: Activities 368
  • 23: Religion 408
  • 24: Grammatical Elements 415
  • 25: Comparative Mythology 423
  • 26: Origins: the Never-Ending Story 442
  • Appendix 1 - Basic Sound Correspondences Between Pie and the Major Ie Groupsa 464
  • Appendix 2 - Proto-Indo-European to English Wordlist 466
  • Appendix 3: An English to Proto-Indo-European Word List 523
  • References 565
  • General Index 591
  • Index Verborum 619
  • Proto-Indo-European 621
  • Index 653
  • Italic Languages 708
  • Slavic Languages 719
  • Tocharian Languages 726
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 731

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.