The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women: From the Earliest Times to 2004

By Elizabeth Ewan; Sue Innes et al. | Go to book overview

W

WADDELL, Roberta Johanna (Bertha), MBE, born Uddingston 17 June 1907, died Cambuslang 17 August 1980. Theatre writer, actor, director and manager; WADDELL, Janet Jane (Jenny), born Uddingston 13 August 1905, died Uddingston 7 January 1984. Theatre director and costume designer, musical accompanist. Daughters of Jean Leadbetter Swan, primary headmistress, and John Jeffrey Waddell, architect.

The Waddell sisters' parents were profoundly interested in the arts. As youngsters, the sisters saw Anna Pavlova dance and Forbes Robertson and Ellen Terry act. Governess-educated, they learned dance, singing and piano, later attending drama and speech classes in Glasgow. Both joined local amateur companies and then the Scottish National Players. Bertha Waddell played, aged 15, a lead role at the Athenaeum in Glasgow, going on to become LRAM. Meantime, Jenny Waddell developed as a musical accompanist. Complementary talents helped them establish the first professional company specifically for children, launched in 1927 in the McLellan Galleries, Glasgow, as the Scottish Children's Theatre (later The Children's Theatre, Bertha Waddell's Children's Theatre). Positive reactions to their first performances led to their beginning to tour, initially to Bearsden, Hamilton and Stirling. Directors of Education noticed them and, beginning with Lanarkshire, they were invited to perform in schools during the day, an important recognition. In 1930, CUKT awarded them £300. Their touring developed on a seasonal basis into schools and public halls throughout Scotland and sometimes beyond. They often spoke of being invited to perform for Princesses Elizabeth and *Margaret (see Snowdon) at Glamis in 1933 and 1935 and at Buckingham Palace in 1937, and for new royal children in 1953, 1955 and 1967. The SAC supported their company, and by their retirement in 1968, which they spent in the family home near Blantyre, whole generations of Scottish children had enjoyed their work.

Bertha Waddell took the lead and, with her sister, developed a very particular style. Shows began with a sound effect and Bertha's head appearing through the curtains, announcing 'Item Number One'. Each performance comprised some dozen or more individually introduced scenes, usually based on folk tales or nursery rhymes. Some used mime or puppets, and music and song were central to the aesthetic. Design was simple, suited to touring constraints. In the 1950s, children's drama began to involve children themselves, engaging them with social and educational issues, and the Waddells' themes and modes came to seem old-fashioned. Bertha Waddell, while defending

-361-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women: From the Earliest Times to 2004
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Advisers to the Project viii
  • Contributors ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Readers' Guide xxiii
  • Introduction xxv
  • The Biographical Dictionary of Scottish Women 1
  • A 3
  • B 21
  • C 56
  • D 90
  • E 109
  • F 115
  • G 130
  • H 153
  • I 177
  • J 181
  • K 188
  • L 200
  • M 214
  • N 280
  • O 285
  • P 289
  • Q 294
  • R 295
  • S 310
  • T 350
  • U 358
  • V 359
  • W 361
  • Y 383
  • Z 384
  • Thematic Index 386
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.