Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology

By Julian Dodd | Go to book overview

Index
Action-Type Hypothesis, Currie's 167–82
aesthetic properties 6, 96, 127, 169, 170, 172, 175, 177, 185, 206, 207, 213, 250, 251, 253–6, 258, 266–8, 270–4
and aesthetic empiricism 169–78, 205–12
and supervenience 209–12
and taste 209
as response-dependent, yet objective 214, 233–5
analogical predication 4, 46–7, 50–1, 83–5, 93–4, 100, 181, 185
artistic properties 225–6, 228, 239, 241, 250, 251–252
not genuinely possessed by musical works 228–9, 255–9, 269
associate-function from properties to types 49, 59–60
Anderson, James 100–2
anti-realism, musical 25–31
Armstrong, D.M. 92
on the existence conditions of properties 65–6
Bachrach, Jay 22–3
basic actions theory 192–4
Beardsley, Monroe 205
Bennett, Jonathan 13
Blackburn, Simon 133
Bright, Bob 189
Burgess, John 13–14, 16
Caplan, Ben vii, 4, 13, 162, 189
on musical perdurantism 157–8
on objects featuring causally in events 15
on the modal argument against the set-theoretical account of works of music 18
Carruthers, Peter 58–9
categorial question in the ontology of music, the 8
and repeatability 3, 5, 10–11, 144
and the type/token theory 5–6, 16, 37, 82, 92, 97, 143
introduced 1–2
Child, William 235
Collingwood, R.G. 26–30
composition 5, 81, 87, 91–2, 245
and the (misleading) analogy with scientific experimentation 170–2, 174
and the role of interpretation in performance 140–2
as contextually conditioned 123–7
as creative discovery 4–5, 35, 56, 69, 106, 112–21, 135, 150, 181, 276
as involving choice 122–3
as the selection of certain properties of a descriptive sound event-type as normative 100–2
as the specification of a recipe for producing properly formed tokens 110–11
Levinson on 128–34
Contextualism 103, 127–8, 186, 239, 263
and doppelganger thought experiments 7, 185, 240–1, 249–75
and Levinson's conception of musical works as indicated types 242–9
and the notion of a musico-historical context 241–3
formulated 203
timbral sonicism defended against 239–75
Continuant View, The 5, 9, 11, 31, 142, 143–66, 168
Cox, Renee 26–9, 99, 122, 124
criticism, the nature of 206–7, 268
Currie, Gregory 4, 5, 9, 102, 143, 183, 184, 186, 188, 200, 202, 207, 209, 212, 218, 244
and his action-type hypothesis 167–82
and Levinson's notion of an indicated type 246–7
Danto, Arthur 190, 243
Davidson, Donald 13, 15, 189, 249, 263
and 'basic actions' theory 192–4

-283-

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Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Type/Token Theory Introduced 8
  • 2: Types I 37
  • 3: Types Ii: Platonism 58
  • 4: Defending the Type/Token Theory I 82
  • 5: Defending the Type/Token Theory Ii 99
  • 6: Musical Works as Continuants 143
  • 7: Musical Works as Compositional Actions 167
  • 8: Sonicism I 201
  • 9: Sonicism Ii 240
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 283
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