Explaining Institutional Change in Europe

By Adrienne Héritier | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

This book represents the outcome of a number of years of research and teaching on institutional change in Europe conducted at the European University Institute in Florence and the Max Planck Institute on Common Goods in Bonn. In the course of this work I have accumulated debts of gratitude to a number of persons. An important part of the argument on institutional change developed in this book is owed to discussions over joint research carried out with Henry Farrell. This research on institutional change focused on the co-decision procedure in European legislation and found its way into several co-published articles. It also gave rise to a larger research project, generously funded by the Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies (Sieps) in Stockholm, in which we extended the scope of research beyond co-decision to include other rules of European decision-making. My book has profited from the discussions held in this wider project context, in particular from the exchanges with Jim Caporaso and Joe Jupille. Crucially, this book has also benefited from the legal expertise brought by Carl-Fredrik Bergström. The discussions with him allowed for a truly constructive interdisciplinary exchange.

This interdisciplinary cooperation is reflected in the co-authored chapter on the institutional rules governing the implementing powers of the Commission (comitology). It is based on Bergström's analysis of the long-term development of comitology (OUP 2005). The second co-authored chapter in this book investigating the Parliament's right of investing the Commission relies on the empirical materials collected by Catherine Moury. I am indebted to her for carefully and scrupulously gathering documents on the decisionmaking processes.

Further debt of gratitude is owed to my colleague Christine Chwaszcza who was willing to invest time and energy to carefully read my theoretical chapter and to offer constructive and critical comments. Stefano Bartolini, in a moment when I was daunted by the order of the task, gave excellent advice about how to make it manageable. My work also gained from the multiple conferences with practitioners of European decision-making organized by Helen Wallace at the Robert-Schuman Center for Advanced Studies. They offered welcome opportunities to listen to first-hand descriptions of the European decision-making processes. And, of course, I am enormously grateful to the numerous interview partners I talked to over the course of the

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Explaining Institutional Change in Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Tables x
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: Plan of the Book 3
  • 3: Theories of Institutional Change 5
  • 4: Empirical Cases 67
  • 5: Conclusion 228
  • References 247
  • Index 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 271

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.