Native Americans and the Environment: Perspectives on the Ecological Indian

By Michael E. Harkin; David Rich Lewis | Go to book overview

7. Watch for Falling Bison
The Buffalo Hunt as Museum Trope
and Ecological Allegory

John Dorst

Among the national icons we have minted from animate nature, the American bison yields pride of place only to the bald eagle. And even at that, the bison alone occupies the role of protagonist in a grand natural history narrative, perhaps the grandest in our national collection of master narratives. The disaster of the bison's sudden, all-but-complete eradication stands as the North American paradigm for heedless destruction of natural resources by human greed and arrogance. The bison's last-minute rescue and then modest recovery completes the ecological morality tale on a satisfyingly hopeful note, without which the bison's story would probably seem as Victorianly remote as that of the passenger pigeon.

It is, of course, another such icon that Shepard Krech undertakes to examine in The Ecological Indian (1999), but the bison as emblematic victim of ecological disaster and the Indian as emblematic good steward of natural resources are intimately bound together. In the natural history bison saga, the rapacious Euro-American stands forth especially vividly against the foil of the indigene as intuitive ecologist. It is not surprising, then, that Krech devotes a chapter to a case study of human/bison ecological relations. Just as the mounted, hunter-gatherer cultures of the nineteenth-century Plains Indians have provided the default image of indigenous peoples for the national popular culture, so the traditional bison hunt, the definitive mode

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Native Americans and the Environment: Perspectives on the Ecological Indian
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 367

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.