Preface

I've written poems and played golf for almost as long as I can remember and have enjoyed the ongoing struggle to master both activities. Through my practice I've discovered many similarities between poetry and golf, with the primary unifying principle being that they both pose “problems to be solved.” Indeed, the solution to a specific swing problem that may have vexed me for some time often becomes clear to me in a dream, as if a great golf teacher were giving his or her lesson directly to me (in fact, they often do!). Likewise, images, ideas, or phrases for poems sometimes come to me in a dream all in a piece, and I wake up excited to write them down on a pad of paper next to my bed.

As a young man I wanted to become a great poet and a great golfer, though more than one sympathetic friend or family member pointed out to me the difficulty of making a living from either, let alone excelling in both! Therefore, although I've written and published poetry throughout my life, just as I've worked to improve my golf game from my days as a college player, I've also heeded reality's call by choosing to earn a living as a freelance arts and golf writer.

In a world of specialists, my work in multiple fields has raised eyebrows, and even I have felt confused at times as to where my true passion lies. A moment arrived when, rather than fight this division, I decided to integrate the two passions. As a wise friend of mine once said, “It's better to proceed through life via addition rather than subtraction.” It is in this spirit that I began writing The Poetics of Golf.

This book does not argue that golf is literally poetry. Rather, it takes golf as its subject matter and a starting place for what aspire to be poetic essays, memoirs, journalism, short fiction, and other meditations on the game, the arts, and life.

For my title, I owe a nod of recognition to Aristotle's Poetics and

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Poetics of Golf
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Golf as Memoir 1
  • 2: Golf as Memoir 53
  • 3: The Golf Swing as the Axis of the World 103
  • 4: Golf as a Tool Chest 151
  • 5: Golf and the Soul 167
  • Source Acknowledgments 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.