Fault Lines: Tort Law as Cultural Practice

By David M. Engel; Michael McCann | Go to book overview

Introduction
Tort Law as Cultural Practice

DAVID M. ENGEL AND MICHAEL MCCANN

The chapters in this book examine tort law's norms, institutions, and procedures as cultural practices. Few observers, regardless of their academic background, their role in relation to tort law, or their political leanings, would challenge the assertion that tort law is a cultural phenomenon. Nor are they likely to reject our working proposition that tort law plays a role in constituting the very cultural fabric in which it is embedded. Yet, despite this consensus, it is surprising to discover that a rigorous exploration of tort law's cultural dimensions has rarely been attempted and that there is virtually no agreement across disciplines as to how such a study should be conducted. Tort law as a form of cultural practice has remained terra incognita. Even the pathways into this unexplored territory are but dimly perceived.

In this volume, a group of leading legal scholars and social scientists has embarked on a voyage of exploration. Drawing on the pioneering work of important precursors, these authors have begun to map the uncharted land. Their work not only identifies useful roadways for those who might follow, but it also demonstrates a variety of techniques by which the journey might be attempted. This collection makes no claim of completeness nor does it claim to have identified a single superior methodology or discipline. Rather, it identifies a large, potentially important area of inquiry and offers some illustrative attempts by a talented group of scholars to reveal the riches that future explorers might discover there.

This initial foray has two important features. First, it is multidisciplinary. The contributors come from different academic fields and departments, including

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fault Lines: Tort Law as Cultural Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 385

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.