Baseball and Philosophy: Thinking outside the Batter's Box

By Eric Bronson | Go to book overview

TOP OF THE SECOND
3 Should Cubs Fans Be
Committed? What Bleacher
Bums Have to Teach Us
about the Nature of Faith

THOMAS D. SENOR

You know the law of averages says that anything will
happen that can. / But the last time the Cubs won the
National League pennant was the year we dropped the
bomb on Japan.

—STEVE GOODMAN, “A Dying Cubs Fan's Last Request”

Cubs fans love the Cubs, warts and all, no questions asked.
This quality is called faith.

—PETER GLENBOCK from the introduction to Wrigleyville:
A Magical History Tour of the Chicago Cubs

Spring is a time for fresh starts and blooming, a season when even the pessimist is tempted to dream of what might be. For Cubs fans, April is the month that brings with it the blessed guarantee that their team will be at least tied for first place for at least one day (Opening Day). Typically, the rest of the baseball season is not so kind to those who pull for the team from Chicago's North Side. The chilly winds of late September that blow across Lake Michigan not only tend to hold back long fly balls from hometown bats—they are also typically concurrent with both the dying leaves of autumn and the fading post-season dreams of the Cubs and their followers.

Yet it is spring and hope is alive. But should it be? Isn't there something positively irrational about believing, year after disappointing year, that this will be the season? Can hope in the absence

-37-

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