Children of a New World: Society, Culture, and Globalization

By Paula S. Fassdear | Go to book overview

5
A Sign of Family Disorder?
Changing Representations of
Parental Kidnapping

In the summer of 1873, “a gentleman of high social position” in Williamstown, New York, hired a “fast livery team” and carried off both his children. He presumably fled with them to Europe, since as “a man of means,” he would “spare no money to cover up the trail.” Although the courts had given this man, a Mr. Neil, custody of one his daughters in the “decree of separation on the ground of incompatibility of temperament,” the other daughter, whom he also took with him, had been awarded to his wife, who now suffered “fearfully over the theft.”1 Recorded in the New York Times 128 years ago, Mr. Neil's abduction of his daughter was an example of what is known today as parental kidnapping. That episode and others like it, while unusual and newsworthy, were hardly unknown more than a century ago because then, as today, husbands and wives fought over the custody of their children. And children were even then pawns in an uncertain legal struggle among the mother, the father, and the state.2

An especially vivid glimpse of the parental tug-of-war over a child took place in New York in 1879 when Henry Coolidge and his former wife Belthiede were found quarreling on West Sixteenth Street in Manhattan over possession of their daughter. “The woman had the child by one arm and the man by the other arm and they were pulling the little girl hither and thither.” Pending the outcome of the divorce instituted by Henry, the judge had ordered one of their daughters to be placed in the custody of the maternal grandmother and the other with a friend of the family. Henry had taken the older girl from the grandmother's house, “ostensibly for a walk,” but he had not returned her. The mother, with the assistance of her own father had retaken the girl and had just met Coolidge on the street where he attempted once again to take the child. This was the background for the little drama that was enacted on the street in New York.

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children of a New World: Society, Culture, and Globalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 269

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.