Children of a New World: Society, Culture, and Globalization

By Paula S. Fassdear | Go to book overview

Introduction Part III

A word with an impersonal and clumsy sound, “globalization,” has often been invoked as a symbol of contemporary social change and a harbinger of a bleak future. As the following essays try to suggest, however, historians have been familiar with this phenomenon, if not with the word itself, for some time. The United States, one could argue, resulted from an earlier incarnation of the thrust beyond familiar boundaries as it occupied a new world and created an unfamiliar hybrid society with global resonances. But, globalization as it is understood today usually refers to changes that have taken place since World War II and have accelerated in the 1990s, as worldwide communications, free markets, and the massive migrations of peoples are remaking personal identities and cultural boundaries.

In this section, I try to use America's peculiar history as a means to better understand globalization today and specifically to evaluate the experiences of children in that world. This is especially the case in the first of these essays, Chapter 7, originally written for a conference on globalization in

, Poland, in November 2001 and subsequently published in the Journal of Social History. In this, my first attempt to use the concept, I try to put what I knew about American experience to use in order to suggest what might be happening to children elsewhere when the conditions begin to approximate those in the United States in the past. I am proposing that American experience can even provide us with a way to anticipate changes elsewhere in the world today. To do this, I attempt to define the elements (such as work, consumption, schooling, and gender) that will likely be affected as the pressures of economic change, media saturation, and the exposure to diverse cultures spread. In this first foray in thinking about globalization and children, I assumed that the United States was both a force for globalization and a model of how it operated.

By the time I wrote the essay published here as Chapter 8, which looks at the effect of contemporary migrations on children, my sense of globalization had become far more dynamic. I now considered how the United

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children of a New World: Society, Culture, and Globalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 269

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.