Dangerous Writing: Understanding the Political Economy of Composition

By Tony Scott | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

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Dangerous Writing: Understanding the Political Economy of Composition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - Embodying the Social in Writing Education 1
  • 1: Professionals and Bureaucrats 36
  • 2: Writing the Program - The Genre Function of the Writing Textbook 60
  • 3: How “social” Is Social Class Identification? 108
  • 4: Students Working 131
  • 5: Writing Dangerously 180
  • Appendix A - Initial Questions 191
  • Appendix B - Code List 192
  • References 193
  • Index 200
  • About the Author 203
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