Writing at Work: How to Write Clearly, Effectively and Professionally

By Neil James | Go to book overview

Chapter notes

To make this book as readable as possible, I have minimised the interruption of footnotes throughout the text. For those wanting more detail, these notes offer specific references and acknowledge intellectual debts. They run continuously, grouped into the three chapter sections, with notes separated by the ■ symbol.

Where a note refers to a source not included in the Further Reading section, I cite it fully below. Where a work is already fully cited in the Further Reading section, I give a short author and year reference, along with the section containing the full reference. For example, 'Herrick (2005, Rhetoric)' means you can find the full citation in the Rhetoric section of Further Reading.

One of the challenges of writing this book was finding a broad range of real workplace samples to illustrate each tool. Organisations do not generally make internal documents publicly available, and clients I work with naturally enjoy full confidentiality. Fortunately, many people have offered me samples, so every example in the text is based on a real-life scenario. The origins of some have been disguised, however, at the request of their authors. The Internet has been a second major source, as workplaces are increasingly using it to post all kinds of documents. Every sample sourced from there is acknowledged below. Where a viewing date for an electronic address is not included, it was last checked in March or April 2007.


Chapter 1: Readers

Toolbox

Details on the Teesdale District Council report come from 'Report “incomprehensible to any normal person”', Teesdale Mercury, 23 November 2006, viewed on 28 November 2006 at .

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Writing at Work: How to Write Clearly, Effectively and Professionally
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Planning 11
  • 1: Readers 13
  • 2: Content 30
  • 3: Structure 50
  • Structure 77
  • 4: Focus 79
  • 5: Persuasion 97
  • 6: Coherence 116
  • 7: Design 134
  • Expression 151
  • 8: Tone 153
  • 9: Grammar 169
  • 10: Words 188
  • 11: Clutter 205
  • 12: At a Glance 222
  • 13: Sentences 241
  • Review 259
  • 14: Punctuation 261
  • 15: Style 280
  • 16: Editing 297
  • 17: Proofing 313
  • Further Reading 330
  • Chapter Notes 343
  • Acknowledgements 361
  • Index 363
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