Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University

By Catherine Chaput | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Authors often use the acknowledgments to thank funding agencies and universities for buying release time and granting sabbaticals; I have only people to thank. I am deeply indebted to many colleagues, friends, and family, both inside and outside the university, and consider this far more valuable than institutional rewards.

Even as I use this book to take the university to task, I cannot imagine working anywhere else. No doubt this is because of the extraordinary people one finds there. My first colleagues as a student of rhetoric were forged at the University of Arizona. It was there that I met Danika Brown and M. J. Braun, the people I turn to when beginning any new project. They have patiently read multiple drafts, provided endless feedback, given me suggestions for further reading, and, most important, encouraged me, entertained me, and supported me as friends and colleagues. It was also at the University of Arizona that I met Ken McAllister, without whom I am sure this book would never have been published. Ken helped me throughout the process, offering advice, discussing ideas, and modeling the kind of academic, personal, and political work to which I aspire.

I owe much also to Thomas P. Miller and Suresh Raval, both of whom supported and challenged my thinking throughout the early stages of this project. My work was further shaped by the activist community in Tucson, especially those involved in the Sex, Race, and Globalization project, Students Against Sweatshops, and the Coalition to Organize Graduate Students. I thank especially Miranda Joseph, Arne Ekstrom, Curtis Ferree, and Kat McLellan.

It does not seem to matter what university one enters. Whether in the Southwest, the Deep South, or the Niagara Peninsula, I have met in-

-xi-

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Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - Historical Materialist Rhetoric and the Hermeneutics of Valuation 1
  • I 27
  • 1: Historicizing the U.S. Public Research University 29
  • 2: Monopoly Capitalism, Globalization, and University Transformation 74
  • II 125
  • 3: The Collusion of Economic and Cultural Systems 126
  • 4: The Rhetoric of University Missions 174
  • III 223
  • 5: Working-Class Professionalism 225
  • Notes 273
  • Works Cited 293
  • Index 319
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