Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University

By Catherine Chaput | Go to book overview

Introduction
Historical Materialist Rhetoric and
the Hermeneutics of Valuation

Capitalist production is not merely the production of commodities, it is,
by its very essence, the production of surplus-value.… If we may take
an example from outside the sphere of material production, a school-
master is a productive worker when, in addition to belabouring the heads
of his pupils, he works himself into the ground to enrich the owner of the
school. That the latter has laid out his capital in a teaching factory, instead
of a sausage factory, makes no difference to the relation.

—Karl Marx, Capital

It is not only that lines separate ethnic, gender, and class prejudice in the
metropolitan countries from indigenous cooperation with neocolonialism
outside, in the Third World proper. It is also that arguments from cultural-
ism, multiculturalism, and ethnicity, however insular and heteromorph-
ous they might seem from the great narratives of the techniques of global
financial control, can work to obscure such separations in the interests of
the production of a neocolonial discourse.

—Gayatri Spivak, Outside in the Teaching Machine

Raymond Williams defines culture as “one of the two or three most complicated words in the English language” (Keywords 87). Cultural studies disputes since this proclamation bare the truth of his statement, but another term, one that Williams does not define, seems to qualify as the other one or two most complicated words in our vocabulary. Among the oldest intellectual and practical arts, rhetoric consistently eludes definition. I emphasize this uncontainable understanding of rhetoric in order to reit

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Inside the Teaching Machine: Rhetoric and the Globalization of the U.S. Public Research University
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction - Historical Materialist Rhetoric and the Hermeneutics of Valuation 1
  • I 27
  • 1: Historicizing the U.S. Public Research University 29
  • 2: Monopoly Capitalism, Globalization, and University Transformation 74
  • II 125
  • 3: The Collusion of Economic and Cultural Systems 126
  • 4: The Rhetoric of University Missions 174
  • III 223
  • 5: Working-Class Professionalism 225
  • Notes 273
  • Works Cited 293
  • Index 319
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.