Little Words: Their History, Phonology, Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, and Acquisition

By Ronald P. Leow; Héctor Campos et al. | Go to book overview

11
Predicting Argument Realization from Oblique
Marker Semantics

JOHN BEAVERS

The University of Texas at Austin

THIS CHAPTER DISCUSSES the role of adpositions and oblique cases (which I group under a single category P, excluding structural cases and their adpositional equivalents) in determining argument realization patterns across languages. Consider the Japanese data in (1) and their English translations, where English clear and Japanese katazukeru, “clear,” both take agent, theme, and source arguments, yet differ in how these arguments may be realized. In (1a) the theme is the object and the source is an oblique marked by from in English and -kara, “from,” in Japanese. In (1b) the source is the object, but only in English can the theme be realized as an oblique, marked by of.

Why should English and Japanese differ in this way? The simplest answer is to blame it on verbal polysemy: clear and katazukeru both have a variant subcategorized for a theme object and an oblique source, but only clear has a variant selecting for a location object and a theme oblique [even though (1b) entails the existence of a theme]. However, this misses significant generalizations about why languages differ in terms of verbal argument structure. A common alternative is to assume that both Vs and Ps can determine clause structure but in different contexts, yielding different realization patterns (following in the tradition of Hale and Keyser 1993). For example, Folli and Harley (2004) propose that change-of-state predicates decompose into a light verb v and a small clause headed by whatever head (V or P) describes the result. On this approach we might analyze (1b) and its translation as in (2) (following Harley's [2005], 62, analysis of smear-type locative verbs), where dyadic of predicates a separation relation between the theme and the source, while monadic

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Little Words: Their History, Phonology, Syntax, Semantics, Pragmatics, and Acquisition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.