The Limits of Sovereignty: Property Confiscation in the Union and the Confederacy during the Civil War

By Daniel W. Hamilton | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I especially want to thank the librarians at Harvard University, the National Archives, and the Library of Congress. I am indebted for research support to the Gilder Lehrman Institute for American History, the Huntington Library, the New York Public Library, the Mark DeWolfe Howe Fund at Harvard Law School, the Littleton-Griswold Fund at the American Historical Association, and the Golieb Fellowship at New York University School of Law.

Of the many people kind enough to offer valuable readings, I am particularly grateful to Christine Desan, Daniel Coquillette, William Fisher and Charles Donahue, James Kloppenberg, William Nelson, Larry Kramer, and Drew Gilpin Faust. All were uniformly generous with their insight and support. I want to thank especially Morton J. Horwitz and the late William E. Gienapp, who were consistently encouraging and always inspiring. From the University of Chicago Press, I want to thank the anonymous readers for their helpful comments. At the press, I was fortunate to work with J. Alex Schwartz, who was an excellent and perceptive editor.

I want also to thank my mother, Ann O. Hamilton, who offered both line editing and unfailingly correct advice. Finally, I want to thank my wife, Mary-Ann, who, as she often does, quickly made everything much better. This work reflects the guidance, patience, and commitment of those I could not have done without.

-vii-

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