The Sangamo Frontier: History and Archaeology in the Shadow of Lincoln

By Robert Mazrim | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TEN
Overlooking Wilderness
Excavations at Elkhart Hill

In the spring of 1817, James Latham lay dying in New Orleans. There is no record of why exactly he had traveled to the port city from his farm in Kentucky, but the trip was probably made to sell farm produce. Thousands of farmers shipped hundreds of tons of pork, grain, and other products to the city each year. By the second week of April, Latham was so ill with fever and dysentery that he was convinced he would not see his family again. After three weeks in bed, somewhere in the old French city, he was surprised to find himself recovering. It was only then that he wrote to his wife, telling her of his brush with death, and warning her that she might not recognize him when he returned. He made arrangements to travel by steamboat up the Mississippi, and hoped to arrive home by the end of May. He told her that when he arrived at the landing nearest their farm, he would have a cannon fired. When they heard the “big gun,” they would know he was home.1

Latham made it back to Kentucky, but within eighteen months, he was 300 miles to the north, in the heart of the Sangamo Country. In the fall of 1818, he came to the region to visit the new home of his son-inlaw (James Chapman), who had just established a ferry across the Sangamon River on Edwards' Trace. Chapman's farm was very near the site on which Governor Edwards had planned to build a fort seven years earlier. Latham wintered along the river with his daughter and son-in-law, and it was probably during winter hunts that he was introduced to a nearby timbered hill surrounded by an ocean of prairie grass. Located

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sangamo Frontier: History and Archaeology in the Shadow of Lincoln
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.