Mass Torts in a World of Settlement

By Richard A. Nagareda | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The completion of this book would not have been possible without the intellectual and personal support of many people. Three extraordinary scholars I am fortunate to count as friends—John Goldberg, Samuel Issacharoff, and Robert Rasmussen—gave generously of their scarce time to read the manuscript. I am grateful for their faith in me and in the project—especially for their willingness to push me hard about the arguments advanced in the book. I am indebted, in addition, to several scholars who enabled me to draw on their expertise in particular subject areas: Lisa Schultz Bressman on administrative law, Paul Edelman on the quantitative aspects of aggregation, Chris Guthrie on the cognitive psychology of litigation, Steven Hetcher on tort theory, Suzanna Sherry on the law of federal courts, and Charles Silver on the theory and practice of aggregate litigation. Howard Erichson, David Rosenberg, and an anonymous reviewer provided extensive comments on the entire manuscript in connection with the editorial process. Still others in the academy and the practicing bar— Timothy Lytton and Mark Plevin, respectively—assisted me in assembling relevant information for the book. I also benefited from the opportunity to present portions of the book at Stephen Bundy and Eleanor Swift's civil justice workshop at Boalt Hall School of Law and other portions at a Vanderbilt University Law School faculty workshop. Finally, two exceptional deans—Kent Syverud and, now, Edward Rubin—have created a dynamic, supportive environment for scholarship at Vanderbilt and accommodated me with the time needed to work intensively on the book.

My thinking about mass torts has been sharpened immeasurably by the opportunity to teach the subject over the past decade to the talented, energized students at both Vanderbilt University Law School and the Univer| 275

-275-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mass Torts in a World of Settlement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 325

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.