Mass Torts in a World of Settlement

By Richard A. Nagareda | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION

1. John C. P. Goldberg et al., Tort Law: Responsibilities and Redress 3 (2004).

2. Palsgraf v. Long Island R.R. Co., 162 N.E. 99 (N.Y. 1928).

3. Brown v. Kendall, 60 Mass. 292 (1850).

4. Escola v. Coca-Cola Bottling Co., 150 P.2d 436 (Cal. 1944).

5. Oliver Wendell Holmes, The Path of the Law, 10 Harv. L. Rev. 457, 467 (1897).

6. See Samuel Issacharoff & John Fabian Witt, The Inevitability of Aggregate Settlement: An Institutional Account of American Tort Law, 57 Vand. L. Rev. 1571, 1577–99 (2005).

7. Michael J. Saks, Do We Really Know Anything about the Behavior of the Tort Litigation System—And Why Not?, 140 U. Pa. L. Rev. 1147, 1212 (1992).

8. See James S. Kakalik & Nicholas M. Pace, Costs and Compensation Paid in Tort Litigation 96 (1986) (96 percent of individual plaintiffs in tort litigation as a whole paid counsel on a contingent fee basis).

9. E.g., Peter H. Schuck, Agent Orange on Trial (enlarged ed. 1987); Marcia Angell, Science on Trial (1996) (discussing silicone gel breast implant litigation); Michael D. Green, Bendectin and Birth Defects (1996); Joseph Sanders, Bendectin on Trial (2001).

10. Jack B. Weinstein, Individual Justice in Mass Tort Litigation (1995). For an instructional casebook in the area, see Linda S. Mullenix, Mass Tort Litigation (1996).

11. On the concept of relative risk, see Michael D. Green et al., Reference Guide on Epidemiology, in Federal Judicial Center, Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence 348–49 (2000).

12. Deborah R. Hensler & Mark A. Peterson, Understanding Mass Personal Injury Litigation: A Socio-Legal Analysis, 59 Brook. L. Rev. 961, 967 (1993).

13. The most significant exception consists of bankruptcy proceedings, a subject discussed in greater depth in chapter 9.

14. 521 U.S. 591 (1997); 527 U.S. 815 (1999).

15. See chapter 5.

16. E.g., David Rosenberg, The Causal Connection in Mass Exposure Cases: A “Public Law” Vision of the Tort System, 97 Harv. L. Rev. 851 (1984).

17. E.g., Ariel Porat & Alex Stein, Tort Liability under Uncertainty (2001); Wendy

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