Downtown Ladies: Informal Commercial Importers, a Haitian Anthropologist, and Self-Making in Jamaica

By Gina A. Ulysse | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
Caribbean Alter(ed)natives: An
Auto-Ethnographic Quilt1

Me don't want to talk…. I don't want to talk to you! I'm in a book already. —Miss Tiny

Once we pluralize the native, the category itself becomes untenable and the savage slot be-
comes open to deconstruction. —Michel-Rolph Trouillot


Expectations Here and There

And when the “native” subjects have talked to one too many researchers, they know. They know that, despite good intentions, ethnographers arrive to collect information and stories about their lives, which will be reorganized and interpreted in a document with which the ethnographers will build their careers. It is a document that various scholars, who seek to “reinvent,” “decolonize,” or “recapture” anthropology, claim has the potential to intellectually, socially, and politically incarcerate subjects within yet another “savage slot,” because anthropology depends on it.2 My purpose here as both “native” and “ethnographer” (to use disciplinary terms) is to situate myself on the margins and write critically against that structure.

When I returned to Jamaica to begin dissertation fieldwork in October 1995, I was reluctant to meet with the United Vendors Association (UVA) officials and the traders I had come to know over the years, because I had told them I would return early the previous spring. I was unable to do so because of funding complications that delayed my departure. The primary trader in the project was surprised to see me.

“Me didn't think you'd come,” she said.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Downtown Ladies: Informal Commercial Importers, a Haitian Anthropologist, and Self-Making in Jamaica
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 333

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.