The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!

By Scott S. Smith | Go to book overview

Introduction

The trouble with most books on public speaking is that they have far more information than anyone can readily implement to improve their style. If you read any of these from beginning to end, you realize much of their content is just excessive repetition, slightly differently said, apparently because the writer was required to fill up space. Or the author beats to death a particular angle on the subject. A good deal is also fluff—in terms of knowing what is important about effective public speaking, there is much said that is trivial and that just makes it harder to clearly see what your priorities should be.

This volume gets to the point for each topic, without sacrificing substance. You certainly do not need to apply every technique for reducing nervousness before you speak, but the most effective ones are mentioned (including some “big picture” ideas about selfconfidence that are useful to know about beyond the podium).

On the subject of structuring a speech, a lot of fancy theories have been put forth that obscure the fundamentals of communication. You need to just keep your objectives in mind and get others to help you think objectively about how to communicate your message.

When it comes to adding some refinements to the basic outline of your proposed speech, it is good to know how to come up with stories, what quotation sources are best, the process of revising, and the use of repetition. But do not let the desire to seem eloquent get in the way of delivering your message effectively.

A sense of humor is something that every speaker should develop, even if she is not planning to give talks that are meant to be funny. It will serve you well in those awkward moments when the projector does not work, a heckler tries to take over your meeting, or the audience is half asleep.

Likewise, this volume sorts the wheat from the chaff about visual aids. Too many speakers get lazy and try to create the speech around these, rather than using visuals properly for support.

-xi-

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The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Everything® Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Top Ten Reasons You Want to Speak Better in Public x
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Overcoming Fear 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Psychology of Fear 11
  • Chapter 3 - The Informative Speech 23
  • Chapter 4 - Eloquent Sources 35
  • Chapter 5 - Refining Touches 49
  • Chapter 6 - You're Only Joking 59
  • Chapter 7 - Managing the Audience 73
  • Chapter 8 - Visual and Audio Aids 83
  • Chapter 9 - It's Debatable 97
  • Chapter 10 - Taking Care of Business 111
  • Chapter 11 - Media Interviews: Preparation 127
  • Chapter 12 - Media Interviews: Showtime 137
  • Chapter 13 - Becoming a Pro: Getting Started 149
  • Chapter 14 - Becoming a Pro: the Big Time 163
  • Appendix A - Sample Persuasion Speech 177
  • Appendix B - Sample Internal Marketing Speech 187
  • Appendix C - Sample Speeches for Almost Every Occasion 199
  • Boosting Morale 201
  • New Business Pitch 204
  • Presenting an Award 206
  • Receiving an Award 208
  • Honoring a Retiring Employee 210
  • Address to Stockholders 212
  • Analyzing a Problem/Proposing a Solution 214
  • Dedicating a New Facility 217
  • Giving a Demonstration 218
  • Running a Meeting 221
  • Giving a Wedding Toast 223
  • Welcome to Company Outing 225
  • Press Conference Announcement 226
  • Welcoming a New Employee 227
  • Farewell to a Departing Employee 229
  • Paying Tribute to an Honoree 231
  • Introducing a Guest Speaker 233
  • Welcome to Convention/Conference 235
  • Index 237
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