The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!

By Scott S. Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
Media Interviews: Showtime

By this point in the process of getting media coverage, you have studied your subject, the audience, and the reporters you may be facing. You have laid the groundwork with media kits, suggested questions, and provided either a press release or some publicity to attract attention to your message. Only now are you ready to open your mouth and step into the limelight. No matter what the medium you are interviewed in the pressure to perform is on. However, your preparation ensures that the risk of a misstep is minimal.


Radio Interviews

Long before the media will want to talk with you, especially for broadcast, you will need to be well prepared in a variety of ways. As with other types of public speaking, practice as much as you can, including taping yourself to be sure you make your points succinctly. Do some research to understand what type of audience you are addressing and listen to the call-ins if you can—some have online archives— and check out Internet chat about the program. Most radio interviews will be done remotely, so you can consult notes as you talk from your office or home. If you go to the station, bring easily read cards with your not-to-be-forgotten points, since things that should be really easy to remember can slip your mind under pressure.

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The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Everything® Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Top Ten Reasons You Want to Speak Better in Public x
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Overcoming Fear 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Psychology of Fear 11
  • Chapter 3 - The Informative Speech 23
  • Chapter 4 - Eloquent Sources 35
  • Chapter 5 - Refining Touches 49
  • Chapter 6 - You're Only Joking 59
  • Chapter 7 - Managing the Audience 73
  • Chapter 8 - Visual and Audio Aids 83
  • Chapter 9 - It's Debatable 97
  • Chapter 10 - Taking Care of Business 111
  • Chapter 11 - Media Interviews: Preparation 127
  • Chapter 12 - Media Interviews: Showtime 137
  • Chapter 13 - Becoming a Pro: Getting Started 149
  • Chapter 14 - Becoming a Pro: the Big Time 163
  • Appendix A - Sample Persuasion Speech 177
  • Appendix B - Sample Internal Marketing Speech 187
  • Appendix C - Sample Speeches for Almost Every Occasion 199
  • Boosting Morale 201
  • New Business Pitch 204
  • Presenting an Award 206
  • Receiving an Award 208
  • Honoring a Retiring Employee 210
  • Address to Stockholders 212
  • Analyzing a Problem/Proposing a Solution 214
  • Dedicating a New Facility 217
  • Giving a Demonstration 218
  • Running a Meeting 221
  • Giving a Wedding Toast 223
  • Welcome to Company Outing 225
  • Press Conference Announcement 226
  • Welcoming a New Employee 227
  • Farewell to a Departing Employee 229
  • Paying Tribute to an Honoree 231
  • Introducing a Guest Speaker 233
  • Welcome to Convention/Conference 235
  • Index 237
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