The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!

By Scott S. Smith | Go to book overview

Giving a Wedding Toast

When David asked me to be his best man, I have to admit I felt nervous at the thought of giving this toast. It made me nervous because I realized I'd have to somehow pick from the thousands of embarrassing stories involving David's bizarre dating experiences that I know. I thought I might tell you about the time he managed to break his nose while out on a blind date. I also thought I could tell you about the date who managed to steal David's wallet during their romantic dinner. But then I figured, no. It's his wedding, so I'll give the guy a break. Instead of embarrassing him, I'll tell a story about myself. It just so happens to be the story of how I met Lisa, now Mrs. David Bernstein, for the first time.

I'd been hearing David describe this fantastic new woman in his life for weeks. Based on everything he told me about Lisa and her background, I had a picture of her in my mind as being pretty high class and stylish, on par with say Grace Kelly or Audrey Hepburn. So you can imagine how panicked I was when, one Saturday night, minutes after I'd come in from a run, David buzzed my apartment to tell me that he and Lisa were downstairs and wanted to come up.

I had been working all week on a nightmarish project that kept me at the office until late hours. To call my apartment a sty at that point is probably an insult to pigs. And this was the time David chose to introduce me to his Grace Kelly. So I did what any guy in my position would do—I tried to hide the mess; you know, frantically shoving the pizza boxes under the couch, putting dirty dishes back in cabinets, stuff like that. I didn't have time, though, to change out of my sweaty workout clothes I was still wearing after my run.

Well, David and Lisa come in, and of course Lisa couldn't be any nicer. After kissing me hello, she went to the fridge, helped herself to

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The Everything Public Speaking Book: Delivering a Winning Presentation Every Time!
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Everything® Series ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Top Ten Reasons You Want to Speak Better in Public x
  • Introduction xi
  • Chapter 1 - Overcoming Fear 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Psychology of Fear 11
  • Chapter 3 - The Informative Speech 23
  • Chapter 4 - Eloquent Sources 35
  • Chapter 5 - Refining Touches 49
  • Chapter 6 - You're Only Joking 59
  • Chapter 7 - Managing the Audience 73
  • Chapter 8 - Visual and Audio Aids 83
  • Chapter 9 - It's Debatable 97
  • Chapter 10 - Taking Care of Business 111
  • Chapter 11 - Media Interviews: Preparation 127
  • Chapter 12 - Media Interviews: Showtime 137
  • Chapter 13 - Becoming a Pro: Getting Started 149
  • Chapter 14 - Becoming a Pro: the Big Time 163
  • Appendix A - Sample Persuasion Speech 177
  • Appendix B - Sample Internal Marketing Speech 187
  • Appendix C - Sample Speeches for Almost Every Occasion 199
  • Boosting Morale 201
  • New Business Pitch 204
  • Presenting an Award 206
  • Receiving an Award 208
  • Honoring a Retiring Employee 210
  • Address to Stockholders 212
  • Analyzing a Problem/Proposing a Solution 214
  • Dedicating a New Facility 217
  • Giving a Demonstration 218
  • Running a Meeting 221
  • Giving a Wedding Toast 223
  • Welcome to Company Outing 225
  • Press Conference Announcement 226
  • Welcoming a New Employee 227
  • Farewell to a Departing Employee 229
  • Paying Tribute to an Honoree 231
  • Introducing a Guest Speaker 233
  • Welcome to Convention/Conference 235
  • Index 237
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