There Is a Balm in Gilead: The Cultural Roots of Martin Luther King, Jr.

By Lewis V. Baldwin | Go to book overview

4
UP, YOU MIGHTY RACE!
THE BLACK MESSIANIC HOPE

It is my solemn belief, that if ever the world becomes Chris-
tianized, (which must certainly take place before long) it will
be through the means, under God of the Blacks, who are now
held in wretchedness, and degradation, by the white Chris-
tians of the world.…

David Walker, 18291

Up, you mighty race. You can accomplish what you will!

Marcus Garvey, 19192

This may be the most significant fact in the world today—
that God has entrusted his black children in America to teach
the world to love, and to live together in brotherhood.

Martin Luther King, Jr., 19643

We have lost our fear of our brothers and are no longer
ashamed of ourselves, of who and what we are. … Let us
now go forth to save the land of our birth from the plague
that first drove us into the “will to quarantine” and to sepa-
rate ourselves behind self-imposed walls. For this is why we
were born.…

Howard Thurman, 19714

1. Charles M. Wiltse, ed., David Walker's Appeal, in Four Articles,
Together with a Preamble, to the Coloured Citizens of the World, But in
Particular, and Very Expressly, to Those of the United States of America

(New York: Hill & Wang, 1965; originally published in 1829), 18.

2. Quoted in John H. Bracey, et al., eds., Black Nationalism in Amer-
ica
(New York: Bobbs-Merrill, 1970), 187–91.

3. Martin Luther King, Jr., “Statement to the Press Regarding No-
bel Trip,” Sheraton-Atlantic Hotel, Atlantic City, N. J. (The Archives of
the Martin Luther King, Jr., Center for Nonviolent Social Change, Inc.,
Atlanta, Ga., 4 December 1964), 1.

4. Howard Thurman, The Search for Common Ground: An Inquiry
into the Basis of Man's Experience of Community
(Richmond, Ind:
Friends United Press, 1986), 104.

-229-

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There Is a Balm in Gilead: The Cultural Roots of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Cast Down Your Bucket Back Home to an Old Southern Place 15
  • 2: Walk Together,Children Family Heritage 91
  • 3: How I Got Over Roots in the Black Church 159
  • 4: Up, You Mighty Race! the Black Messianic Hope 229
  • 5: Standing in the Shoes of John 273
  • Conclusion 337
  • Index 340
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