The Ridiculous Jew: The Exploitation and Transformation of a Stereotype in Gogol, Turgenev, and Dostoevsky

By Gary Rosenshield | Go to book overview

Notes

Notes to Introduction

1. F. M. Dostoevskii, Polnoe sobranie sochinenii, ed. V. G. Bazanov et al., 30 vols. (Leningrad: Nauka, 1972–1990), 4:55. All translations from the Russian are mine unless otherwise indicated. The Library of Congress transliteration system will be used to record references in Russian and to transcribe individual Russian words; a modified version of this system (system I in J. Thomas Shaw's pamphlet on transliterating Russian) will be used in all other instances. See J. Thomas Shaw, The Transliteration of Modern Russian for English-Language Publications(New York: Modern Language Association of America, 1979).

2. There are only two major monographs devoted to the representation of the Jew in nineteenth-century Russian literature: Gabriella Safran's excellent Rewriting the Jew: Assimilation Narratives in the Russian Empire (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000) and Joshua Kunitz's Russian Literature and the Jew (New York: Columbia University Press, 1929). For several useful survey articles, see P. A. Berlin, “Russkaia literatura i evrei,” Novyj zhurnal, no. 71 (1963): 78–98; D. I. Zaslavskii, “Evrei v russkoi literature,” Evreiskaia letopis' 1 (1923): 59–86; B. Gorev, “Russkaia literatura i evrei,” in V. L. L'vov-Rogachevskii, Russko-evreiskaia literatura (Moscow: Moskovskoe otd-nie Gos. Izd., 1922), 5–29. For a representative sample of monographs on the image of the Jew in English literature, see Michael Ragussis, Figures of Conversion: “The Jewish Question” and English National Identity (Durham: Duke University Press, 1995); Frank Felsenstein, Anti-Semitic Stereotypes: A Paradigm of Otherness in English Popular Culture, 1660–1830 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995); Abba Rubin, Images in Transition: The English Jew in English Literature, 1660–1830(Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1984); Anne Arest Naman, The Jew in the Victorian Novel: Some Relationships between Prejudice and Art (New York: AMS, 1980); Harold Fisch, The Dual Image: The Figure of the Jew in English and American Literature (London: World Jewish Library, 1971); Frank Modder, The Jew in the Literature of England (New York: Meridian, 1960); Edgar Rosenberg, From Shylock to Svengali: Jewish Stereotypes in English Fiction (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1960); F. Montagu, The Jew in the Literature of England to the End of the Nineteenth

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