Your Career Game: How Game Theory Can Help You Achieve Your Professional Goals

By Nathan Bennett; Stephen A. Miles | Go to book overview

4 MOVES IN THE CAREER GAME

The biggest break in my career was getting into the Beatles in 1962.
The second biggest break since then is getting out of them.

George Harrison

Because games are characterized by a series of moves, there is no more central concept to understanding your career game. In this chapter, we offer a typology to distinguish different kinds of moves. Some moves that you make will be instrumental because they help you move closer toward your goal. Unfortunately, some of your moves may turn out to be blunders that you will then struggle to overcome. Other moves will be incidental in that they have little impact on your game other than to have allowed you to fulfill an obligation to take a turn. After that, we discuss some of the most common examples of these types of moves.

When considering each move, the central objective is to understand the most probable impact that it has on the play of the larger game. For example, what does the move reveal about your strategy? How might you expect other players to interpret and then react to your move? In our discussions below, we will make an effort to explore how a player's goals—the way he or she defines winning the game—as well as other situational factors, impact the quality of various moves. A challenge here is that, while, with hindsight, it is relatively easy to label a move a success or a misstep, our approach advocates giving priority to developing an appreciation for the utility of a move before it is made. Further, because the career game can be very nuanced and personal, it becomes your challenge to understand the way in which the prototypical moves that we illustrate would impact your game.


A TYPOLOGY OF MOVES

As mentioned above, we suggest that moves belong to one of three categories: instrumental moves, blunders, or incidental moves. Because this last type of move has, by definition, little or no bearing on the career game, we will focus

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Your Career Game: How Game Theory Can Help You Achieve Your Professional Goals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Your Career as a Game 7
  • 2: Understanding Fundamental Game Theory Concepts 33
  • 3: What You Need to Know to Play 73
  • 4: Moves in the Career Game 118
  • 5: As You Move On 164
  • 6: Career Agility 208
  • Conclusion 241
  • Index 249
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