Globalizing Capital: A History of the International Monetary System

By Barry Eichengreen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Introduction

The international monetary system is the glue that binds national economies together. Its role is to lend order and stability to foreign exchange markets, to encourage the elimination of balance-of-payments problems, and to provide access to international credits in the event of disruptive shocks. Nations find it difficult to efficiently exploit the gains from trade and foreign lending in the absence of an adequately functioning international monetary mechanism. Whether that mechanism is functioning poorly or well, it is impossible to understand the operation of the international economy without also understanding its monetary system.

Any account of the development of the international monetary system is also necessarily an account of the development of international capital markets. Hence the motivation for organizing this book into five parts, each corresponding to an era in the development of global capital markets. Before World War I, controls on international financial transactions were absent and international capital flows reached high levels. The interwar period saw the collapse of this system, the widespread imposition of capital controls, and the decline of international capital movements. The three decades following World War II were then marked by the progressive relaxation of controls and the gradual recovery of international capital flows. The fourth quarter of the twentieth century was again one of significant capital mobility. And the period since the turn of the century has been one of very high capital mobility—in some sense even greater than that which prevailed before 1913.

This U-shaped pattern traced over time by the level of international capital mobility is an obvious challenge to the dominant explanation for the post1971 shift from fixed to flexible exchange rates. Pegged rates were viable for the first quarter-century after World War II, the argument goes, because of the limited mobility of financial capital, and the subsequent shift to floating rates was an inevitable consequence of increasing capital flows. Under the Bretton Woods System that prevailed from 1945 through 1971, controls loosened the

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Globalizing Capital: A History of the International Monetary System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - The Gold Standard 6
  • Chapter Three - Interwar Instability 43
  • Chapter Four - The Bretton Woods System 91
  • Chapter Five - After Bretton Woods 134
  • Chapter Six - A Brave New Monetary World 185
  • Chapter Seven - Conclusion 228
  • Glossary 233
  • References 241
  • Index 259
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