Christianity and Modernity in Eastern Europe

By Bruce R. Berglund; Brian Porter-SzŰcs | Go to book overview

State Management of the Seer Vanga

Power, Medicine, and the “Remaking” of Religion
in Socialist Bulgaria

GALIA VALTCHINOVA


INTRODUCTION

The conventional wisdom holds that religion was suppressed in, or absent from, communist societies. But proponents of this interpretation often obscure facts that counter the black-and-white view. Based on careful ethnographies, anthropologists such as Caroline Humphrey and Katherine Verdery have shown the dangers of oversimplification in the study of socialism. Similarly, the anthropological study of religion also refuses easy dichotomies.1 The “domestication” formula is already applied to religion in the USSR with regard to the local-level negotiation between the official discourses and ongoing practices.2 The rigid interpretations of religion under socialism were challenged in an analysis of ritual, an area of study that highlights transformation and more vividly depicts state socialism's failure to uproot religiosity.3 Ritual is part of the religious realm: after religious rituals were banned from the public (though not necessarily the private) life of “socialist citizens,” other rituals were invented. Ritual life just shifted from one domain of life to another.4 As a site for the expression of symbolic relationships, ritual is the arena where power materializes and is negotiated.

More attentive to local practice, the anthropology of postsocialism also pays attention to the local actors of religious life. The sociology of religion has also inspired this approach; from Luckmann's “invisible religion” to “religion as memory” to “religion in everyday life” in the new French sociology, there is a marked shift from a church-oriented perspective to a societal- and actor-oriented one.5 This shift is defended by the philosopher Charles Taylor, who demonstrated the importance of non-institutional religion and the “less structured” spiritualities.6

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Christianity and Modernity in Eastern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.