Given World and Time: Temporalities in Context

By Tyrus Miller | Go to book overview

Religious Revivals
The Binds of Religion and Modernity in Friedrich

Nietzsche's The Anti-Christ and Richard Wright's
The Outsider

Andrew Wegley

One linchpin that holds together Western modernity, the secularization thesis, is crucial in narrating the historical progress of society away from religious control to individual determination. The thesis can be seen as comprising six components: 1) the creation of different institutional apparati that separate religion from politics, 2) the depoliticization and privatization of religion, 3) the decline in religious belief, 4) the development of cultural identity, 5) the rise of the state as governmental form, and 6) the production of capitalist markets.1 Together these components describe the new phenomenon that constitutes modernity as different from religious and traditional cultures. Moving away from religion, the secularization thesis makes the radical claim that society is free to cultivate spaces of critique and uses of rationality that promote or contest institutions.2 However, this thesis has undergone scrutiny itself and has been seen as not accurately describing the shifts and phenomena associated with modernity. Here, I will make another attempt at describing how the secularization thesis is problematic and misconstrues the nature of “modernity.” But, my attempt will not be concerned primarily with historical data, but rather with literature. I will read two works that already contain complex views on the relationship between “modernity” and “religion,” not simply to prove false the secularization thesis, but rather to open up the discursive modalities in which religion is still internally present in the modern.

Friedrich Nietzsche's The Anti-Christ and Richard Wright's The Outsider are examined with an eye to their related concepts of religion, in order to gauge how they themselves already offer a complicated understanding of the religion/modernity split that underlines the secularization thesis. The readings and interpretations I offer, which contest the secularization thesis before its postmodern critics, call into question the efficacy and name of modernity.3 The theory of

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Given World and Time: Temporalities in Context
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.