How Community Colleges Can Create Productive Collaborations with Local Schools

By James C. Palmer | Go to book overview

This chapter presents an annotated bibliography of recent ERIC documents that describe the benefits and pitfalls of collaborations between community colleges and high schools.


11
Sources and Information

Charles L. Outcalt

Both this volume and the educational literature offer examples of successful partnerships between community colleges and high schools. This chapter provides an overview of additional case studies from the ERIC database that describe success stories as well as cautionary tales. These examples demonstrate the need to be sensitive to public perceptions of partnerships and the limitations of dual-enrollment programs. Most ERIC documents (publications with ED numbers) can be viewed on microfiche at over nine hundred libraries worldwide. In addition, most may be ordered on microfiche or on paper from the ERIC Document Reproduction Service (EDRS) by calling (800)443-ERIC. Journal articles are not available from EDRS, but they can be acquired through regular library channels or purchased from the University Microfilm International Articles Clearinghouse at (800)521–0600, extension 533.


The Advantages of Collaborative Efforts

Kussrow (1995) provides brief case studies of several innovative North Carolina partnerships between community colleges and high schools and, occasionally, the private sector. This unpublished paper offers a useful discussion of the rationale and benefits inherent in such joint efforts. Kussrow advises that successful partnerships must be based on good communication among all parties. Once effective communication has been established, the community colleges, secondary schools, and other involved organizations can set mutually agreeable goals. In addition, successful partnerships require mutual commitment; an appreciation of all parties' resources, needs, and limitations; clarification of the roles each party will play; and regular assessment of the partnership's ability to meet both its goals and its participants'

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