Writing from the Inside Out: Transforming Your Psychological Blocks to Release the Writer Within

By Dennis Palumbo | Go to book overview

Writing from the Inside Out
Transforming Your Psychological Blocks
to Release the Writer Within

Dennis Palumbo

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

New York • Chichester • Weinheim • Brisbane • Singapore • Toronto

-iii-

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Writing from the Inside Out: Transforming Your Psychological Blocks to Release the Writer Within
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Writing from the Inside out i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One: The Writing Life 9
  • Writer's Block 15
  • Your “baby” 19
  • Inspiration 23
  • The Buddy System 26
  • It's Alive! 29
  • Your “precious Darlings” 32
  • Writing Begets Writing 35
  • Part Two: You Are Enough 39
  • Simple, but Not Easy 45
  • What Really Happened… 49
  • “For I Have Done Good Work” 53
  • On the Couch 57
  • “You're No John Updike!” 61
  • Part Three: Grist for the Mill 65
  • Envy 69
  • Faith and Doubt 72
  • Fear 75
  • The Judge 79
  • Double-Barreled Blues 82
  • Myths, Fairy Tales, and Woody Allen 86
  • The Long View 91
  • Part Four: The Real World 95
  • The Pitch 101
  • Rejection 105
  • That Sinking Feeling 108
  • Reinventing Yourself 112
  • Deadline Dread 115
  • Three Hard Truths 119
  • Part Five: Page Fright 123
  • Gumption Traps 127
  • Procrastination 130
  • Patience 134
  • Perspective 138
  • In Praise of Goofing off 141
  • Writing about Dogs 145
  • Going the Distance 148
  • Part Six: The Real World, Part II 153
  • Agents 159
  • Home of the Heart 163
  • The Unknown 167
  • Lately, I Don't like the Things I Love 171
  • Ageism 175
  • Part Seven: Hanging on 179
  • Commitment 185
  • News Flash: Writing Is Hard! 189
  • Burnout: A Modest Proposal 193
  • A Writer's Library 197
  • A Stillness That Characterizes Prayer 201
  • Part Eight: Dispatches from the Front 205
  • Phone Call from Paradise 211
  • The Idea Man 216
  • I've Come a Long Way on Paper 220
  • Loneliness 223
  • Larry: A True Story 226
  • Conclusion 239
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