The Battle over Hetch Hetchy: America's Most Controversial Dam and the Birth of Modern Environmentalism

By Robert W. Righter | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

IN CONTRAST perhaps to novelists, historians are highly dependent on others. Archivists and librarians deserve special praise. Somewhere in the past they decided to keep material, not knowing whether it might be useful or not. To those past archivists who had the foresight to keep Hetch Hetchy materials, I offer a hearty thanks. Those in the present I can thank directly. The staff at Southern Methodist University were particularly helpful. Michael Foutch helped dig out engineering books and journals, and the staff at Interlibrary Loan assisted in finding some esoteric material. The DeGolyer Research Library held materials on Hetch Hetchy that did, indeed, surprise me. Former director David Farmer, now retired, gave generously of his time. Present director Russell Martin and Betty Friedrich deserve my special thanks. No one can possibly do justice to the Hetch Hetchy controversy without using the invaluable collections of the Bancroft Library, University of California. The staff there, particularly Teresa Salazar, Susan Snyder, Jack Von Euw, and Walter Brem pointed me in directions I might have missed. Also, a special thanks to Jim Snyder, the archivist and librarian at the Yosemite Archives and Library, Yosemite National Park. Archivists at the San Francisco Room of the San Francisco Public Library provided materials unavailable elsewhere. Stanford University; the National Archives, College Park, Maryland; and the Federal Record Center, San Bruno, California, provided interior department and court documents which rounded out the story.

I have, of course, benefited from the help of specialists in the field of environmental history. Michael Cohen, Richard Sellars, and Mark Harvey made many substantive suggestions on one or more of the chapters. I have also profited from conversations with Karen Merrill, Donald Worster, Hal Rothman, Richard Orsi, Richard Lowitt, Richard White, and David Beesley. I owe particular thanks to Dan Flores, who spent hours listening to and com-

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The Battle over Hetch Hetchy: America's Most Controversial Dam and the Birth of Modern Environmentalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • The Hetch Hetchy Harriet Monroe vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Hetch Hetchy Chronology xv
  • Cast of Characters xvii
  • List of Illustrations xxi
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter 1 - The Uses of the Valley 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Imperial City and Water 29
  • Chapter 3 - Water, Earthquake, and Fire 45
  • Chapter 4 - Two Views of One Valley 66
  • Chapter 5 - San Francisco to [Show Cause] 96
  • Chapter 6 - Congress Decides 117
  • Chapter 7 - To Build a Dam 134
  • Chapter 8 - The Power Controversy 167
  • Chapter 9 - The Legacies of Hetch Hetchy 191
  • Chapter 10 - Restoration 216
  • Afterword 242
  • Notes 245
  • Index 279
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