Michael Polanyi: Scientist and Philosopher

By William Taussig Scott; Martin X. Moleski | Go to book overview

A Note on Names

For the sake of simplicity, in telling the story of the Polanyi family, we have tried to use the final English versions of each person's name throughout the narrative. Michael Polanyi was born Mihaly Lazar Pollacsek and was nicknamed Misi. The Hungarian spelling of the new surname given to the Pollacsek children includes an accent, Polanyi, but the accent is customarily dropped in English; for his Hungarian colleagues, we have kept their accents intact, even though they did not appear in the credits to the scientific articles they wrote in German. Polanyi's mother's name may have been Cecilia or Cecilie; she is also called variously Cecil, Cecile, or Cecil-Mama. His brother Karl was born Karoly. Polanyi's two sons were originally called Georg and Hans rather than George and John. Polanyi's sister Laura is called by her nickname, Mausi, throughout the text. Mausi and Sandor Striker and their children sometimes spelled their name "Stricker." Marika Striker became "Maria" in the United States.

When describing dialogue or correspondence between members of the Polanyi family, we use first names only, for example, "Michael to Mausi" or "Karl to Michael."

-xvii-

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Michael Polanyi: Scientist and Philosopher
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xv
  • A Note on Names xvii
  • Abbreviations xix
  • Part I - Hungary: 1891–1919 1
  • 1: Early Years: 1891–1914 3
  • 2: Coming of Age in the Great War: 1914–1919 33
  • Part II - Germany: 1919–1933 53
  • 3: Karlsruhe: 1919–1920 55
  • 4: The Fiber Institute: 1920–1923 67
  • 5: Institute for Physical Chemistry: 1923–1933 93
  • Part III - Manchester: 1933–1959 131
  • 6: Physical Chemistry and Economics: 1933–1937 133
  • 7: The Philosophy of Freedom: 1938–1947 171
  • 8: Personal Knowledge: 1948–1959 211
  • Part IV - Scholar at Large: 1959–1976 237
  • 9: Merton College, Oxford: 1959–1961 239
  • 10: At the Wheel of the World: 1961–1971 247
  • 11: The Last Years: 1971–1976 279
  • Epilogue 293
  • Appendix: People Interviewed by William T. Scott 295
  • Notes 297
  • Bibliography of Works by Michael Polanyi 327
  • Index 351
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