Thomas Jefferson: A Biography

By Nathan Schachner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 41 Vice-President Jefferson

THE administration of John Adams commenced under inauspicious circumstances. If relations with England were somewhat better because of Jay's treaty--inadequate as it was--those with France were considerably worse. A steady succession of French ministers had managed to keep the pot boiling furiously; first Genêt, then Fauchet, and now M. Adet, the last of a curious trio.

France, flushed with a series of victories over England and her allies, was pushing revolution into every nook and cranny of the Continent, and was not disposed to treat as an equal with the futile little republic across the seas. She dismissed American neutral rights as contemptuously as ever the British had done, and paid no heed to any protests. It was now the Federalists who breathed fiery demands for war against the transgressor. Hamilton, ill at ease in his retirement, joined the fray with a series of public papers, in which he demanded Adet's recall and roused the people against supineness in the face of French aggression.1

Jefferson was greatly alarmed over the situation. War even with England had been far from his thoughts; war with France was unthinkable. Yet the clamor grew; every eastern merchant, every shipowner and moneyed man joined in public meetings and memorials. And Hamilton had added his powerful pen.

However, Jefferson hoped that war could be avoided. "I do not believe," he had written Madison. "mr. A[dams] wishes war with France; nor do I believe he will truckle to England as servilely as has been done. If he assumes this front at once, and shews that he means to attend to self-respect & national dignity with both the nations, perhaps the depredations of both on our commerce may be amicably arrested. I think we should begin first with those who first begin with us, and, by an example on them, acquire a right to re-demand the respect from which the other party has departed." In other words, France had merely been following England's example; and if the United States was to become "tough," let it be with England first.

He was inclined at this time to blame everything on Washington, whom he sarcastically described as "fortunate to get off just as the bubble is bursting, leaving others to hold the bag." Any trouble that might arise would be attributed to the new administration; and Washington would have his "usual good fortune of reaping credit from the good acts of others, and leaving to them that of his errors."

In fact, Jefferson's letters of this period are extremely bitter against his

-588-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thomas Jefferson: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1074

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.